Flash Fiction

While My Guitar Gently Weeps by Kathryn Aldridge-Morris

Four months to the day after George Harrison died, Ron was barbecuing Cumberland sausages at the back of his new terraced house, wearing nothing but extra-large boxers and his grandmother’s apron. Fat grease shone on his chest hair. ‘Local paparazzi’s been,’ he said, snapping open a can of Fosters. ‘Yeah?’ His daughter pretended not to …

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Lady Grey by Sophia Holme

You pretend you don’t care, but I know you do. Your big family box of PG Tips grows steadily emptier each week. So I bring my own deep-bellied stainless steel strainer, I bring my own parcel of loose leaf tea, the buds jostling in the wax-coated brown paper. You pretend it doesn’t matter if I …

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Degeneration by Amanda Saint

She’s not sure when her heart first started to shrink but she remembers when she noticed it had. It was the day she stepped round the homeless woman outside the train station and tutted at her for being in the way, putting her slightly off course. She couldn’t afford even that momentary delay in her …

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Crystal Season by Norah Blakedon

We bonded over crystals: you the believer, me the sceptic. Summer days when flash downpours scented the air with rust and an arch of colour framed the sky. Rose quartz and peridot dotted the grass, glass flowers amongst emerald blades.  “Here, take this lapis lazuli. It’s the stone of friendship.” A row of creamy opals …

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I Am Coin by Rosaleen Lynch

My spirit rests in one of the thirty pieces of your soul’s silver, tendered, a test of my undaunted mettle, I am coin, a victim of the currency that barters with my worth, not a curse, a vengeful seduction, I’m found in the Kabul hoard, amongst the punch-marked siglos, and in the ancient Athenian decadrachms, …

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Going Down by Tim Craig

The elevator is between the twenty-first and the twenty-second floor when the cable snaps, so the passengers have some time to share their life stories before they hit the ground. ‘I married too young,’ says the woman with the red hair and the butter-soft gaze and the lapel badge which reads ‘Baby on Board’. ‘I …

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