Flash Fiction

Hits & Mrs by Nikki Williams

Truth be told, though it was Eric’s doing, it was hardly his fault.  It was she, after all, who was late for her ‘August 22 @ 11:00am’ interview, retreating with a watery glare when the receptionist ignored her wheedling. Stomping dejectedly into the street, she slammed into Eric in a silky-smooth blur. When he straightened …

Hits & Mrs by Nikki Williams Read More »

The Puppeteer by Nicola Platt

I sob convincingly into her shoulder. She’s so sorry. She feels responsible. She can’t believe he’d do this. Except she does believe it. Of course she does. Why would I lie? They had started out as a casual, no-strings-attached thing, but now every few days I end up painstakingly picking through the tangle she’s got …

The Puppeteer by Nicola Platt Read More »

The Lost Art of Letter Writing by Rick White

The care home has a sound. The disembodied chatter of TV gameshow hosts, a distant timpani of plates and cutlery, the tectonic rumble of industrial washing machines. The residents themselves speak in broken syntax, haunted parentheses. Mouths yawning, forgetful. ​Yulya starts her shift at seven. By the time she gets her first break at noon …

The Lost Art of Letter Writing by Rick White Read More »

Static by Bethan James

When I was little, I wondered how something as dainty as a radio could fit so many people inside it. How all the owners of those droning voices could come from a thing the size of a toaster. A whole tiny town’s worth trapped inside, each person pressing themselves against the grill of the speaker …

Static by Bethan James Read More »

Loomer by Lucy Goldring

When my loom band hobby becomes obsession Mum renames me. Take it as a compliment, she says, it’s a cool tune. Don’t say cool, Mother, I say, resolving never to listen to said tune. But someday I will. Although only ten, I know this. Generation Zedders are pathologically inquisitive, you see. Ignorance makes us twitch. …

Loomer by Lucy Goldring Read More »

Space by Emily Harrison

He climbs the ladders into the mouth of the attic, flicking the switch for the light he installed one lukewarm summer, some years ago.  Back then, he held the intention of turning the attic into a space for his daughter to play with Barbies and plush bears. He made countless promises to his wife that …

Space by Emily Harrison Read More »